Sew For Victory – Women at work

I’ve had a change of heart since I last wrote about Sew for Victory. Instead of a post-war Butterick 5281, I think I’d rather channel Rosie the Riveter on this one.

women of britain factories

Before war broke out, society had clear expectations of where a woman should be – at home. If she were to work, she shouldn’t earn more than her husband and marriage was meant to put a stop to any semblance of a career. But when World War II began, society had to buck up its ideas.

Suddenly, women weren’t just working in industries previously considered ill-suited for females, they were also actively encouraged to get stuck in as part of the war effort.

In the UK, unprecedented amounts of women joined the industrial workforce out of sheer necessity. Between 1940 and 1945, in engineering alone, the amount of skilled and semi-skilled female workers jumped from 75% to 85%. The picture was very similar over the pond, as thousands of American women helped make machines and airplanes in their hundreds.

It’s fascinating – while there are still problems with sexism in the modern workplace, we’ve come a long way from the idea of a female engineer being “radical” or just a plain necessity because of a shortage of men. For probably the first time since World War I, no one batted an eyelid at women carrying out so-called unfeminine work because they had more important things to worry about.

When the war ended, it was automatically assumed these women would leave their jobs as the men returned. In London, the monument to the Women of World War II depicts 17 sets of uniform and clothing which represents the hundreds of jobs women undertook and then left at the end of the war.

I think it’s safe to say, that while things didn’t change immediately, the work women did during the war began a shift in the perception of women’s role in society. The more I thought about this challenge, the more I wanted to pay tribute to that.

Practicality is key. The plan is to make something which isn’t restrictive and which could easily fit in to the wardrobe of a 40s working woman. And hey – while I usually sit in an office most of the day, every now and then I have to do something silly like tramp around mud looking for evidence of fly tipping (this resulted in some embarrassing photos), so it wouldn’t hurt to have a smart yet practical item for any journalistic eventuality.

Given my last-minute decision, I won’t be making trousers, because I’ve never made them before and I wouldn’t want to rush it! Instead, I’m going to take inspiration from Rosie and go for a classic shirt-dress. Comfy and non-restrictive, that’s the aim of the game!

How are your challenges going? It’s just as well Rochelle¬†extended the deadline on this one, phew!

Me Made May ’12 – Goodbye, leopard print Sorbetto

BAD NEWS

Just as I was feeling all chuffed with myself for pairing up one of my newest Me Mades with the last ever garment I bought from cheaptastic Primarni, I noticed THIS:

A rip in the sleeve!

GAH. I knew I shouldn’t have been in denial about the fit on this one! It doesn’t help that the fabric I used frays ridiculously easily.

I’ll just have to keep my eye out for some more suitable but adequately leopard printed fabric to make another Peter Pan collared Sorbetto, but one that fits properly and doesn’t fray so much this time.

What should I do with this one? I’m loathe to throw it out, but there’s not an awful lot of fabric to play with. Suggestions will be very much appreciated!

Me Made May 12 – Make do and mend

Apologies for the lack of Me Made documentation yesterday! I travelled back to Cardiff more or less straight after the end of my placement, meaning I didn’t get back until about midnight.

Needless to say, I’m glad I won’t have to do anymore long train journeys for a while now!

Day 10 was all about the graduation skirt, paired with a lace t-shirt – a birthday gift from the lovely Ki! You should see the pink jeans she got me as well, they’re a treat.

Me Made Day 12 was all about comfort – sitting on a train for five hours is no joke! My Me-made item is actually one you’ve seen briefly before, but, as yet, has gone unblogged.

Too often, I make something which just ends up lost at the bottom of my wardrobe. I really loved my Cynthia Rowley jumper dress to start with, but, as happens all too often with clothes, I fell out of love with it and left it to gather dust in my wardrobe.

Now, as I recall, the double-knit fabric was actually pretty expensive, so I decided it was high time I did something with it. Knowing how much I wear my black double-knit pencil skirt from H&M, I nabbed some elastic from my sewing box, traced the skirt shape and made myself a green and navy houndstooth skirt out of my abandoned dress.

Needless to say, I’m pretty happy with the results, and now I know how well it withstands the train journey! I was really wary about cutting up the dress, because the sleeves took me bloody ages, but I’m glad I did. After all, what was the point of all that effort if I wasn’t going to wear it?

There are a couple more me-made items in my wardrobe needing to be upcycled, so this won’t be the last you’ll see of projects like these.